Meet The World’s Tiniest Deer, Pudu

Meet The World’s Tiniest Deer, Pudu

You may have seen a lot of tiny creatures, but what if we see a tiny creature that is usually not tiny? Meet the world’s tiniest deer Pudu, which seems the most adorable because of its size. They are so lovely and heart-melting that no animal lover can resist. 

Most deer are large enough, but the Pudu deer is even smaller than a canine and considered the tiniest deer in the world.

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Let’s grab some more interesting facts about this lovely creature. 

There are two species of the Pudu Deer.

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There are two species of Pudu; Northern Pudu from Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru, and Southern Pudu from Chile and South-west Argentina. Pudus is about 32 to 44 cm tall and 85 cm in length. However, Pudus are the world’s smallest deer, but the Southern Pudu is slightly larger than the Northern Pudu. 

Meet The World’s Tiniest Deer, Pudu

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Most often, Pudu habitats are in a damp, moderate winter and an arid summer climate. 

Pudus are sexually dimorphic.

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There is a slight sexual dimorphism is noticed in Pudus. Males have antlers, while females are devoid of them. Males of Pudu have short and spiked antlers that are not forked, as seen in most species of deer. 

Meet The World’s Tiniest Deer, Pudu

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Diet habits of Pudu.

These tiny creatures are herbivorous, consuming vines, leaves from shrubs, low trees, succulent sprouts, herbs, ferns, buds, blossoms, tree bark, and fallen fruits. You will be surprised to know that they can survive for long without consuming water, due to the high water content of the succulent foliage in their diets.

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Pudus are solitary.

The Pudus are solitary animals and their behavior in the wild is largely unknown because of their secretive nature. They only come for the rut (the mating season for certain species). 

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Meet The World’s Tiniest Deer, Pudu

The lifespan of the Pudu.

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The lifespan of Pudus ranges from 8 to 10 years in the wild, and the longest recorded lifespan is 15 years and 9 months. 

Females become mature in 3 months while it takes around 8 to 12 months for males to become mature. 

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They have various methods of obtaining foliage. 

They sense the source of food by smelling the wind and detecting food scents. The Pudus can also climb tree stumps and branches to reach higher foliage. Pudus also bend bamboo shoots horizontally to walk on them and eat from higher branches. 

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Pudus are threatened due to human interruption in their rainforest habitat. A wide area of land is cleared for human development, cattle ranching, agriculture, and exotic tree plantations. They are also taken from the wild as pets and exported illegally as well. 

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The Southern Pudu is listed as near threatened on the IUCN Red List, mainly because of hunting. 

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