Meet The White-Winged Fairy Wren, A Gleaming Blue Jewel Of Australia

White-Winged Fairy Wren

When you see this White-Winged Fairy Wren flying as if a gleaming blue jewel is flying overhead, your jaw will drop. Yes, this is even more dazzling and beautiful than blue sapphire. 

White-Winged Fairy Wrens are native to Australia and usually live in the drier parts of Central Australia. 

Advertisement

This Fairy Wren is also sexually dimorphic like other fairy-wrens- males have brightly colored plumage most prominently during the breeding season. They have black bills and white wings. 

On the other hand, females are light brown with light-blue tails. 

Advertisement

White-winged fairy-wren (Malurus Leucopterus) belongs to the Australian Wren family and are most likely to be found in heathland and arid scrubland, where low shrubs provide cover.

Like other passerine birds, it is small in size and measures 4.3 to 5.3 inches in length. 

Advertisement

The white-winged fairy-wrens are cooperative breeding species.

White-Winged Fairy Wren

Young ones are not only cared for by their parents but other birds collectively take care of the babies. Pairs and other several helper birds form a group together and they assist in raising the young ones.

Advertisement

White-winged Fairy Wren is a monogamous species.

 White-winged Fairy Wren

Three subspecies are found of White-winged fairy wren.

There are two more subspecies recognized of the white-winged fairy-wrens, one is found on Dirk Hartog island, and the other one is on Barrow Island off the coast of Western Australia. Male Wrens of these islands have black plumage instead of blue breeding plumage.

Advertisement

The White-winged fairy wrens mainly feed on insects, sometimes they also eat small fruits and leaf buds.

 White-winged Fairy Wren

 Their courtship display is as wonderful as they are.

Advertisement

Males pluck petals from different flowers and display them to female white-winged fairy-wrens to impress them. In another courtship display male bows forward facing the female with spreading his plumage in a horizontal plane for up to 20 seconds. Their white wings form an appealing white band across their darker plumage.

 White-winged Fairy Wren

Advertisement

As it is clear by the name, their white wings are especially highlighted during flight.

Both males and females make a call named ‘reel’ to unify the group.

Females build dome-shaped nests with spider webs, fine grasses, and thistles (flowering plants). 

 White-winged Fairy Wren nests

They place their nest close to the ground in thick shrubs. 

Their nests are placed in thick shrubs and close to the ground. Females lay a clutch of 3-4 eggs and incubate them for 2 weeks.

Advertisement

In the southwest of Western Australia, white-winged fairy wrens breed in the spring season and breeding occurs any of the months after a period of rainfall in arid regions of central and northern Australia.

They are adapted to a dry environment.

The habitat of these birds is destroyed due to the clearing of natural vegetation by humans and also being preyed on by Red foxes and feral cats.

 

Advertisement
Advertisement

Advertisement

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *