All About Wallabies: Small Kangaroo-Like Animals

Wallabies

Wallabies are captivating creatures that belong to the Kangaroo family and are known for their adorable appearance and unique characteristics. Let’s explore the world of wallabies and gather more interesting facts about these Kangaroo-like animals. 

Physical Appearance 

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Wallabies are middle-sized marsupials (carry their young ones in a pouch) native to Australia and New Guinea. They are smaller than Kangaroos with a varying size of 2 to 6 feet. The color and pattern of their fur varies according to species, allowing them to blend well with their natural surroundings. 

Wallaby carrying baby in the pouch

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Wallabies have powerful hind legs, which are not only used for jumping and hopping at great heights but also used to administer vigorous kicks to fend off predators. They also use their powerful tails for balance and support. 

Habitat and Distribution 

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Wallabies are native to Australia but have a distributed population in other countries including New Zealand, the United Kingdom, Hawaii, etc. They are well-adapted to different environments and can survive in both hot and cold climates. 

Diet and Feeding Habits

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Wallaby eating

Wallabies are herbivorous, and their diet consists of a wide variety of grasses, vegetables, leaves, and other foliage like tree bark. Their sharp teeth help them in chewing their food efficiently. 

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If food and water are scarce, they cover vast distances and even congregate near a water source during the dry season. 

Social Behaviour

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Wallabies

Wallabies are social animals and can be found living in small groups called mobs. Their social nature and amicable behavior make them domesticated by many. Wallabies are most active during the early morning and late afternoon, spending the rest of the day resting or grooming themselves.

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Different Names

Like many other marsupials, young wallabies are called “joeys”, adult wallabies are referred to as “bucks”, while females are known as “does.” A group of wallabies is called a “mob”, “court”, or “troupe”. 

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Wallabies

Life Cycle

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Female wallabies have a pouch where they carry their young ones called joeys. After the birth, the underdeveloped joey crawls into the pouch of the mother and attaches itself to a teat. The baby remains in the pouch for several weeks, until it is ready to venture out.

There are 9 species of wallabies: some are listed as “least concern” while others are “vulnerable” due to habitat loss and hunting. Wallabies are hunted for fur and meat. They face several threats due to feral cats, red foxes, dingoes, and humans as well. With the rapid increase of urbanization, Wallabies have lost their natural habitat and often feed near the roads and rural areas, which leads them to get involved in vehicular accidents. 

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