The Diamond Firetail Looks Just Like A Contrasting Jewel

The Diamond Firetail

We all are fond of diamonds and jewels, whether they are many-colored or have a sparkling silver shine. 

Have you ever seen a bird that looks like a real-life flying diamond with wings? 

Advertisement

The Diamond Firetail is one of the most mesmerizing birds in the finch family with its ash-gray plumage and white underparts. They have the most captivating black flanks with white spots and their vermilion rump with a black tail. 

The Diamond Firetail (Stagonopleura guttata) is a species that belongs to the family Estrildidae (grass-finches). They are native to Australia and generally occupy drier forests and grassy woodlands. 

Advertisement

It is one of the largest of the Australian finches which weighs around 15-19 gm and has a wingspan of 64-71 mm. The young Diamond Firetail is duller than the adults and has a black bill. 

The Diamond Firetail

Advertisement

Contrasting Christmas Jewel!

The Diamond firetail is highly distinguished because of its flame-colored rump and tail, and snow-white underparts. The eyes of the Diamond Firetail are black and bright red.

They have a black breast band and black wings with white spots. 

Advertisement

Look at their gorgeous scarlet bills.

They have a patchy distribution from Southeast Queensland to the Eyre Peninsula in South Australia. 

The Diamond Firetail spends most of the time being seated. 

The Diamond Firetail is a sedentary bird and lives in grassland with scattered trees, open grassy eucalypt forest and woodland, heath, mallee country, and farmland. 

The Diamond Firetail

Advertisement

The Diamond Firetails mostly feed from the ground and take grass seeds.

They are most likely to feed on ripe or partially ripe grass seeds from the ground. Occasionally they also eat insects and larvae. They can be seen actively feeding on the ground, but they’ll immediately fly up to trees if disturbed.

According to different guides, they produce two-hee or pain vocalization and a “drawn-out” contact call. 

Draw your attention to the nesting habits of the Diamond Firetail.

diamond firetail finch

Advertisement

Their nests are constructed with green grass, stems, and leaves and lined with feathers and fine grasses. Nests of the Diamond Firetail can be seen in dense foliage such as “hakeas, boxthorn, rose bushes, and Sea Urchin Hakea. 

To safeguard their eggs and nestlings, they often build their nests into the base of the large stick-nest of a bird of prey, such as a White-bellied sea- eagle, Whistling Kite, Brown Falcon, Square-tailed Kite, etc. 

Both parents take care of their young ones.

Females of the Diamond Firetail lay a clutch of 4 to 9 eggs per season. The most inspiring thing that should be learned from the Diamond Firetail is that both parents take part in the incubation and care for the young ones.

Advertisement

diamond firetail finch

The bird is generally seen in pairs or small flocks, which sometimes extend up to hundred birds. Their habitat has been threatened by the alteration of vegetation caused by overgrazing, salinization, weed invasion, and other flow-on processes. 

Due to habitat loss and lack of main food plants, competition with invasive species and predation has increased. The IUCN evaluated the Diamond firetail as a vulnerable species.

Advertisement

Do you also feel its appearance looks like a contrasting Christmas jewel?

We’d love to hear your opinion.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Advertisement

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *