Pay Attention To The Black And Red Broadbill- A Bird With Velvet Black And Red Wine Color

Black And Red Broadbill

Black and red are the combination that is the most favorite among several color combinations and is almost indispensable. The black and red combination may be your go-to color combination or that you can’t deny. How about spotting a bird in the same color combination? Yes, we’re going to introduce you to a bird that is splendidly blended in black velvet and red wine color.

Meet the Black and Red Broadbill, a large bird that is named after its colors. The bird is scientifically known as the Cymbirhynchus Macrorhynchos. The Black and Red Broadbill is a species of bird in the typical broadbill family, Eurylaimidae. 

Advertisement

They have dark red or maroon underparts, velvet black plumage, a dark red neckband, and most prominently turquoise blue and yellow bill. The Black and Red Broadbill is mostly found in Cambodia, Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand, Laos, and Vietnam.

 We have compiled some stunning photographs and interesting information about the Black and Red Broadbills. Let’s read more.

Advertisement

Meet this Black and Red Broadbill displaying its ravishing look in the most desirable colors.

Black And Red Broadbill

The Black and Red Broadbill have a distinctive striking velvet-black plumage. Adult birds have blackheads and breastbands. Dark greenish-black upper parts are combined with bright maroon rumps and upper-tail coverts. The outside feathers of the shoulder bone have white hints, forming a white line. 

Advertisement

They have bright blue or sometimes violet-tinged feet.

Look at their turquoise-blue bill.

They have the most captivating bills of the bright turquoise-blue bill and a yellow-orange mandible with a blue tip and edges.

Advertisement

Black And Red Broadbill

They have a black tail with a large amount of white on it.

Their bright emerald green iris is an artistic view.

They are large birds measuring around 21 to 24 cm in length with wings of 9.7 to 10.8 cm. 

This species is slightly sexually dimorphic.

Males of the Black and Red Broadbill species are slightly larger than females.

Advertisement

Juveniles are duller than the mature Black and Red Broadbills.

 Black And Red Broadbill

Immature birds are similar to adults except for their browner upper wings, white tips on the second row of coverts on the wings along with purple irises. They have sooty brown upper parts and wings, blackish to brownish-blue bills, and bronze irises also. 

Advertisement

Pale blue-gray feet have also been noticed in juveniles.

Nesting usually occurs in the driest months of the year.

Their nesting depends on its range as it usually occurs in the driest months such as, from January to August in Malaysia, in May and June in Thailand, from late February to June in Myanmar, and December to August in Borneo.

Advertisement

 Black And Red Broadbill

Mostly their nests are built over forest pools, rivers, streams, and less commonly over coastal slacks, and on man-made drainage ditches also.

They have insects such as ants, beetles, caterpillars, grasshoppers, and bugs for their diet and also feed on a variety of riverine creatures such as small fishes and snails.

 Black And Red Broadbill

The Black and Red Broadbills are found near the edges of mangroves, rubber plantations, coconut groves, or orchards near water channels.

They mainly inhabit riparian forest edges at an altitude of 300 meters, although sometimes can also be noticed up to 900 meters. 

Advertisement

They can also survive in secondary forests.

The Black and Red Broadbills have distinct vocalizations.

As compared to the other species of typical broadbills, the Black and Red Broadbills often remain silent, but they have some quieter calls. They make short, soft, and slow ‘weeet’ sounds and an alarm call with a series of rapid ‘pip’ notes. There has been a repeated soft ‘wiark’ also reported as a contact call between a pair building a nest.

Advertisement

 Black And Red Broadbill

Their food is mainly available near water, so it may be the prominent reason for nesting near water. You need not worry about their population because they are considered as least-concern on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 

Advertisement

Please comment down your thoughts about this velvet black and red wine-colored bird. 

 

Advertisement
Advertisement

Advertisement

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *