Tempting Red-headed Woodpecker With Zebra Striped Wings

Red-headed Woodpecker With Zebra Striped Wings

Since childhood woodpeckers have been known for their drumming calls, which are very distinctive and can be heard commonly in backyards. They don’t just have a distinctive sound, they can also have an appealing appearance. This Red-headed Woodpecker with zebra-striped wings and striking feathers will blow your mind. 

They are beautiful enough to make your day with an unforgettable memory to spot them. Red-headed Woodpeckers can be seen across North Amercia. Their breeding habitat is Southern Canada and the East-central United States. Mostly Red-headed Woodpecker is confused with Red-bellied Woodpecker, which is similar in size. But they have bright orangish red crowns and nape.

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The scientific name of the Red-headed Woodpecker is Melanerpes Erythrocephalus, which belongs to the family Picidae. This species is monotypic and no subspecies are recognized as Red-headed Woodpeckers.

They are medium-sized birds and measure from 19 to 25 cm in length with a wingspan of 16.7 inches. They weigh around 76 grams. 

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Get your hands on some wonderful pictures of Red-headed Woodpecker.

Meet the Red-headed Woodpecker.

Red-headed Woodpecker With Zebra Striped Wings

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Adults of Red-headed Woodpecker are distinctly tricolored, with a black back and tail, a red head and neck, and a white belly and rump. Their wings are lustrous black and have some striking white tinges on them, which look like zebra stripes.

Both male and female woodpeckers have similar appearances.

Red-headed Woodpecker With Zebra Striped Wings

Juvenile Red-headed Woodpeckers have similar markings except for their gray heads.

Red-headed Woodpecker Juveniles With Zebra Striped Wings

Red-headed Woodpeckers are omnivorous.

They eat insects, fruits, seeds, berries, and nuts mostly. But they also eat small rodents (rats, mice, hamsters, etc.) and even the eggs of other birds occasionally. 

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However, two-thirds of the diet consists of plants. 

Red-headed Woodpecker With Zebra Striped Wings

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This species stores food in different locations such as cavities, crevices, and under tree bark, by hiding that from other conspecifics, for times when food is not plentiful. 

They make a tchur-tchur call or a drum on their territory.

Their relationship tends to be monogamous.

Male Red-headed woodpecker establishes a territory and begins calling and drumming to attract a mate, during the breeding season. They remain paired for multiple breeding seasons.

Males are truly hard workers.

For nesting, females choose the location by tapping on a site. It might be a natural cavity, a wintering cavity used by the male, utility poles, a cavity used the season before, or just a dead tree. If the chosen site doesn’t have a nesting cavity, then both males and females drill out together and the male does most of the work.

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Red-headed Woodpecker With Zebra Striped Wings

As per studies, females lay four to seven white eggs in early May. 

After laying eggs females incubate them during the day and males incubate them during the night. Incubation lasts for 2 weeks. 

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Young ones are cared for by both parents.

The Red-headed woodpecker has been evaluated as the Least Concern species by the IUCN Red List of Endangered Species. There is a decline noticed in the population of the Red-headed Woodpecker, due to habitat loss.

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