Northern Royal Flycatcher: The Queen Of Birds

Northern Royal Flycatcher: The Queen Of Birds

Some birds are alluring enough to leave stunned at first sight by their charming features, such as the Northern Royal Flycatcher. The Northern Royal Flycatcher is entitled by the “Queen of Birds”, due to its gorgeous crown. 

The Northern Royal Flycatcher is also known as the Amazonian Royal Flycatcher, as this stunning bird is found in the Amazon Rainforest. The Northern Royal Flycatcher is a small passerine bird in the family Tityridae and is scientifically known as Onychorhynchus Mexicanus. Mainly, they are found in Mexico, south through most of Central America, western Venezuela, and northwestern Colombia.

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Say ‘Hello’ to this stunning Northern Royal Flycatcher.

Northern Royal Flycatcher: The Queen Of Birds

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The Northern Royal Flycatcher is a small bird measuring around 16 to 18 cm in length. 

The Northern Royal Flycatchers are small birds, but while erecting crests, their appearance seems comparatively larger than they are. 

They have brown above, with small colorful buffy spots on their wing coverts, and the same yellow underparts. The rumps and tails of the Northern Royal Flycatcher are colorful buffy cinnamon. 

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The most striking feature of the Northern Royal Flycatcher is an erectile fan-shaped crest that is orange-red in the male and yellow-orange in the female birds.

Northern Royal Flycatcher: The Queen Of Birds

Their erecting crowns are usually observed during courtship or when they are agitated. 

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These stunning birds with gorgeous crowns inhabit humid lowlands, both primary evergreen and second-growth forests. 

The Northern Royal Flycatchers are insectivores and hence they have sharp and hooked bills to catch insects. 

Northern Royal Flycatcher: The Queen Of Birds

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The breeding season of the Northern Royal Flycatcher.

The Northern Royal Flycatchers breed between March and May or June in Costa Rica and between April and July in Guatemala. They build long and narrow nests suspended from a branch or vine, usually above water. 

Females of Northern Royal Flycatchers lay a clutch of two eggs. Only female birds incubate them and brood and feed the nestlings. 

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A descending, slowing series of plaintive whistles by the Northern Royal Flycatchers have been noticed.  

Northern Royal Flycatcher: The Queen Of Birds

The habitat of the Northern Royal Flycatcher has been losing and fragmenting due to deforestation. However, they are listed as a species of least concern on the IUCN Red List but conservation efforts are needed to ensure their long-term survival.

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This species is still a topic of debate.

The International Ornithological Committee (IOC) considers the Northern Royal Flycatcher as a separate species and places them in the family Tityridae. The South American Classification Committee of the American Ornithological Society (SACC-AOS) and the Clements taxonomy consider four other birds to be subspecies of the Royal Flycatcher. Clements places the Northern Royal Flycatcher in the family Oxyruncidae. 

Well the gorgeous crown of the Northern Royal Flycatcher truly gives it a status of the queen.

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