Fearless Stork Sticks Its Head In The Mouth of A Crocodile To Snatch Its Meal Back

Fearless Stork Sticks Its Head In The Mouth of A Crocodile To Snatch Its Meal Back

An amazing and spine-chilling scene was captured in the Selous Game Reserve In Tanzania, where a fearless stork sticks its head in the mouth of a crocodile to get its food back.  

Storks are renowned for their excellent hunting skills as they use their long narrow beaks to snatch up their prey. However, every now and then, they lose their prey or some part of that. This is exactly what happened with this stork who was feasting on a fish-unfortunately, a crocodile scooped it up.

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The crocodile had snatched the fish.

Fearless Stork Sticks Its Head In The Mouth of A Crocodile To Snatch Its Meal Back

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Safari guide Mark Sheridan Johnsan who witnessed this amazing scene said that it was one of the most hilarious moments of his life. Furthermore, he said that he noticed that the stork was playing with something in the water, it was the head of a tiger fish. For a second, it looked like that stork had caught its prey, but unfortunately, its head was close to the crocodile’s jaws. The crocodile nearly nipped the bird, which made it appear like it also had the stork’s head in its jaws.

When the stork realized that the crocodile had the fish, he thought that he had lost the battle.

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Fearless Stork Sticks Its Head In The Mouth of A Crocodile To Snatch Its Meal Back

When Stork realized that the crocodile had the fish in its mouth, he gave up on its prey. But the fearless stork kept fishing near the crocodile. One would think that these birds stay away from the crocodiles, but this is not the truth. Actually, crocodiles aid these birds- when crocodiles swim across the water they disturb the fish, allowing the storks to see and then catch their prey easily. So, it is common to see storks lurking near crocodiles. 

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However, the stork couldn’t get that fish back, but he was getting others due to the crocodile. 

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